Archive by Author

Musical Notation: Spy Music III: TV Spies

26 Apr

In this episode, West plays music from TV spy shows of the 1960’s.

Sequelcast 2: Mortal Kombat: Annihilation

26 Apr

Mat and William discuss 1997’s Mortal Kombat: Annihilation, the sequel to 1995’s Mortal Kombat.

Sequelcast 2: Mortal Kombat

26 Apr

Mat and William discuss 1995’s Mortal Kombat.

Czech That Film Tour 2017: The Teacher, by Dayne Linford

26 Apr

Social systems have a tendency to self-replicate, and therefore self-reinforce, all the way down the ladder, forming a fractal pattern, a series of the same values and, often, the same abuses. Growing up in a capitalist system, children learn to be good little mini-businesspeople, trading candy at lunchtime and favors after school. Learning to exist according to class, the janitor’s kid soon knows to pay deference to his friend, the banker’s son. In fiction, it’s often these small-scale replications that are the most fruitful, the most intimate and powerful. Jan Hrebejk’s The Teacher is certainly one of these, the story of a small classroom in 1983 Czechoslovakia, dominated by a dictatorial teacher, who begins each school year by taking down the occupations of her student’s parents, a helpful guidebook for an extortion scheme revolving around petty favors rendered in exchange for good grades.

(more…)

I Do Movies Badly: Starship Troopers

26 Apr

In this episode, Jim ships off to space with Paul Verhoeven’s Starship Troopers.

Criterion Prediction #86: The Passenger, by Alexander Miller

26 Apr

Title: The Passenger

Year: 1975

Director: Michelangelo Antonioni

Cast: Jack Nicholson, Maria Schneider, Jenny Runacre, Ian Hendry, Steven Berkoff

(more…)

EPISODE 527: Nick Flanagan

25 Apr

In this episode, Tyler and David are joined by comedian/actor/musician Nick Flanagan to discuss, among other things, Film Comment in the 1980s.

Czech That Film Tour 2017: Tiger Theory, by Dayne Linford

25 Apr

I’ve always been a huge fan of the comedic subgenre surrounding the “battle of the sexes” – women and men pitted against each other, usually ending in a tempestuous and hilarious romance. Your standard romantic comedies are a derivation of what Shakespeare perfected, though they never seem to go quite far enough. To work, it must be an actual battle – that is, two equal, individualized forces pitted against each other. There’s more to Beatrice and Benedict than gender, and more to them together than alone. Many, many variations on this theme can be found throughout Western storytelling, of which Radek Bajgar’s Tiger Theory is another, sadly inferior take. Though well-written, often honestly funny, and well-acted throughout, Tiger Theory forgets the most important rule – we must be on both sides at once, or it’s boring.

(more…)

BP’s Top 100 Movie List Challenge #68: Brazil, by Sarah Brinks

25 Apr

I decided to undertake a movie challenge in 2017. This seemed like a good way to see some classic movies that I have unfortunately never seen. The Battleship Pretension Top 100 list has a good number of films I hadn’t seen before so it is a good source for my challenge.

I have a real soft spot in my heart for daydreamers, and Sam Lowry is certainly a daydreamer. I wasn’t sure how I would respond to Brazil, but I really enjoyed the strange world building and the story of man chasing down a dream in a world that only seems surface deep. Jonathan Pryce’s portrayal of Sam made him a bright spot to grasp onto in the bleak, grey world that writer/director Terry Gilliam sets the film in. The world is cold, industrial, and full of hard angles. In the middle of all that is a man who just wants to be a hero and find love. He dreams of flying free and fighting oppression. In contrast, his real day job is as just another suit working for the government. As much I enjoyed Pryce’s performance, I do have to say anytime he was in a fight scene it really stood out that he is not an actor who seems naturally suited to action.

(more…)

New to Home Video 4/25/17

25 Apr

Review

Review

Review