Archive by Author

Criterion Prediction #81: The Limey, by Alexander Miller

22 Mar

Title: The Limey

Year: 1999

Director: Steven Soderbergh

Cast: Terence Stamp, Peter Fonda, Lesley Ann Warren, Luis Guzman, Barry Newman

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Shout!/Scream Factory Prediction #1: The Dead Zone, by Alexander Miller

21 Mar

Title: The Dead Zone

Year: 1983

Director: David Cronenberg

Cast: Christopher Walken, Brooke Adams, Tom Skerritt, Herbert Lom, Colleen Dewhurst, Anthony Zerbe, Martin Sheen

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BP’s Top 100 Movie Challenge #78: Blade Runner, by Sarah Brinks

21 Mar

I decided to undertake a movie challenge in 2017. This seemed like a good way to see some classic movies that I have unfortunately never seen – the Battleship Pretension Top 100 provided just that challenge.

I’m hoping this is a safe space because I must admit that this was first time I had ever watched Blade Runner in its entirety. I had tried watching it once before and gave up. I feel like I had gleaned a lot of the plot from pop culture, but it was good finally see it. And just to be clear I watched the ‘Final Cut’ version of the film.

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New to Home Video 3/21/17

21 Mar

Review

Review

Review

Musical Notation: John Williams & Steven Spielberg, Part I

21 Mar

In this episode, West Anthony plays music composed by John Williams for three films directed by Steven Spielberg.

Monday Movie: The Ballad of Jack and Rose, by David Bax

20 Mar

After making a minor splash with 2002’s sensuous feminist triptych Personal Velocity, director Rebecca Miller has yet to register strongly on the film world’s radar again. That’s unfortunate because her follow-up, 2005’s The Ballad of Jack and Rose, remains an overlooked gem. Retaining the earthy tactility of the previous feature, this effort is simultaneously more intimately focused and more grandly ambitious, as visually rewarding as it is morally challenging.

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EPISODE 522: One Hit Wonder Directors

20 Mar

In this episode, Tyler and David discuss directors who only made one good movie and Tyler introduces a new game called This or That.

Space Invaders commentary!

19 Mar

COMING SOON!

Song to Song: They’re Never Really Gone, by Scott Nye

19 Mar

Romance, the feeling, is a key component to most of Terrence Malick’s films, but he’s heretofore ducked and dodged from Romance, the genre. Days of Heaven, with its pulpy con plot beginnings, comes closest, but he maintains the same distance he did in Badlands by utilizing a dispassionate observer as our point of view into its world. As his career has gone on, he’s abandoned more and more such literary devices nearly every time out, coming closer to the pure shit (some critics would drop the article) of a lived cinema. Beginning with To the Wonder in 2012, he has gradually rid himself of plot, narrative coherence, or sometimes even common sense, chasing the Eden his characters so often find and lose. Song to Song is reportedly the last film he’ll make, for now, in this mold, and rightly so. Here he has perfected it. Here he has tired of sailing past his Indies, and found peace in consummated love.

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BP’s Top 100 Movie Challenge #79: Badlands, by Sarah Brinks

18 Mar

I decided to undertake a movie challenge in 2017. This seemed like a good way to see some classic movies that I have unfortunately never seen – the Battleship Pretension Top 100 provided just that challenge.

Terrence Malick’s films are usually hit or miss with me and Badlands, his first feature length film, was a miss. One thing that I struggle with in film is when characters don’t seem to care about anything. Badlands is a great example of characters like this. Sissy Spacek watches her father get gunned down in front of her and she has less of a reaction then when her dad shot her dog earlier in the film. Martin Sheen’s Kit, who does the shooting, seems to barely care. Even the people that Kit shoots barely seen inconvenienced by it. He shoots his old garbage route buddy Cato, who just lies down in bed and checks himself out in the mirror while bleeding to death. If the characters don’t even care about their own deaths, how is the audience supposed to get invested?

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