3 responses

  1. FictionIsntReal
    July 6, 2016

    I find it hard to believe that a filmmaker would put a framed picture of Pol Pot in a film and not expect the audience to regard even sympathetic characters as too extreme. I would have also expected the groupthink of the supposed non-conformists to be an intended takeaway, since that ironic combination has been popularly noted for decades.

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  2. PhotographsLie
    July 11, 2016

    Interesting review. I haven’t seen the movie, yet, obviously, but I’ll be interested in whether the film’s portrayal of the development of a counterculture is authentic.

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  3. Laurens Amsterdam
    February 13, 2017

    This review reads as a personal fear of the portrayed alternative way of life, and mistakenly assumes the subjects point of view is the same as the filmmakers. I think this is a wonderfully subtle film that’s nowhere as extreme as the viewpoints of the subjects.

    At no point in the movie did I not feel invited to have my own opinion on Viggo Mortensens way of raising a family. I especially disagree that these people are portrayed as better than anyone else. I laughed out loud at most of the extreme viewpoints, from the ‘unique’ names to the naive critique of capitalism. Ultimately, these elite athletes need the same hospital as everyone else, which would not exist in a self sustainable forest village.

    Of course, the film takes a point of view: the way the kids get back to Viggo is problematic in my opinion, but ultimately the film argues a moderate viewpoint, in which the extremism of Viggo Mortensen is condemned, much more so than ‘evil mainstream America’. Too bad this reviewer takes it all as a personal attack on everything ‘normal’.

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