EPISODE 480: artist profile of WALTER MURCH

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4 Responses

  1. FictionIsntReal says:

    Kings didn’t turn the Bible’s best-friendship into a gay relationship. “Jack Benjamin” is gay, but he’s also not that close with David. He’s actually unhappy that his father, King Silas, has raised David up so highly. And he doesn’t go against his father on behalf of someone else, but as part of a coup to seize the kingdom for himself.

    • Battleship Pretension says:

      Indeed, there were a number of changes to the David/Jonathan relationship (and to Jonathan himself). Jack was seen as a sort of petulant kid, jealous of Silas’ love for David, which was undoubtedly rooted partially in Silas’ inability to accept Jack as he was. So, there was a more contentious attitude toward David.
      However, in regards to Jack being gay, I was thinking ahead a bit. Though I haven’t seen it in a while, I seem to recall that the series was starting to make him a more likable character, whose attitude towards David was beginning to change. I genuinely think that, had the series continued, it would have brought the characters closer together in friendship, at which point Jack’s sexuality would’ve played a role, either directly or unconsciously in the minds of the audience. Not to imply it would’ve turned into a gay relationship, but seeing as how KINGS seemed to lean more towards more conventional plot developments, I think there would’ve been a definite “unrequited love” quality to Jack’s friendship with David.
      Of course, all of that is speculation. But, seeing what the series had chosen to do so far, and my own ability to recognize familiar story patterns, I feel like that’s where they were headed.

  2. Beth says:

    I liked your discussion about “male BFFs” (as the episode description goes) a lot! I hadn’t stopped to think about the various effects an actual Cap/Bucky relationship would have, and the perspective that it would take away from the power of their *friendship* was very interesting. As a frequent-enough user of Tumblr, I get used to seeing various male friends “shipped” and I get that there are so few interesting and mainstream gay relationships that it’s a really exciting idea, but I agree with Tyler that showing deep (male) friendship bonds can be nearly as important, especially for its effect on actual human behavior and social norms/bullshit gender roles. I feel the same way about the representation of male-female friendships and the lack of representation of really good, strong ones in which *neither* friend ever feels any attraction to the other. I’ve had several of those relationships in reality and they’re different enough from my female-female friendships that I think the dynamic is interesting enough to be on screen.

  3. Ryan says:

    As a gay man, it seems to me all the “bromance” and “man date” talk is a self conscious whistling past the graveyard, a way of negating close male friendships by “calling them out” as gay, ha ha, isn’t that a hilarious joke?
    But a less cynical interpretation might be that as homosexuality becomes more normalized, we might see close male friendships in art and be immediately trained to think there might be subtext, there. Certainly, if Bucky were a female character, she and Cap would already be a couple by now, no question. Platonic male-female friendships in film are more rare than George R R Martin book publications.
    So a certain percentage of the population might just be picking up on the language of movies that’s always existed for heterosexual relationships: close friendships lead to sex, almost 100 percent of the time.
    And then there’s the other group that just think it would be hot. Hi.
    Regardless, I’m assuming most people understand that Cap will never ever ever have a boyfriend, as that don’t play in Peoria (not to mention China), and the hashtag is just for fun.

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