I Do Movies Badly: Pieta

22 Mar

Jim weeps over the corpse of his month of Kim Ki-duk movies, finishing things up with Pieta.

3 Responses to “I Do Movies Badly: Pieta”

  1. W. David Lichty March 23, 2017 at 6:45 am #

    I’ll repeat my advice from some time ago. *If* you decide to do a bonus episode, maybe see if David would talk with you about these. What better time for a follow up than when two film-articulate people who enjoy each other and respect each other’s views disagree on … hmm, tastes? Where value is found? Who knows, but it might be a nice chat, and maybe give yourselves extra hockey talk time to grease the wheels of good nature. As a non-sports guy, it’s as easy for me to skip 30 minutes as it is 15, so have at it.

    Alternately, wash this nasty swill down with some good chocolate. Do an episode on one of your favorite movies ever, and why it is. What better way for us to know more about you than to have the contrast of hearing you talk about some picture you know well? Just a thought.

    I hope you get someone to give you a bunch of Kurosawa next month. You need a break.

    • Jim March 30, 2017 at 10:37 am #

      I’ll more than likely be doing the summer recap episodes that I did last year and David will definitely be back to answer for his crimes.

      As for next month, I’ll be resetting my palette with some Paul Verhoeven. I need the pendulum to swing in the opposite direction.

  2. FictionIsntReal March 24, 2017 at 12:18 pm #

    You are absolutely right that the woman is NOT the protagonist’s mother, but is instead just playing out a long revenge scheme for her actual son, who hangs himself at the beginning.

    The reason I listen to this show is because I’m also ignorant of many filmmakers & genres, this way I can follow along someone in the same boat. I used to use The Canon podcast for film recommendations, but that’s defunct.

    I have to assume the protagonist wishes he had a mother, but given how hardened he is won’t immediately accept her. At a certain point it’s clear that she’s willing to put up with everything awful he can do to her, convincing him that she really is offering the unconditional love of motherhood. But I agree with you on how strange the arc is. Even at the end when he learns the truth, he seems more sad at the death of his mother than anger that he’d been tricked.

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