Category: monday movie

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Monday Movie: Sands of Iwo Jima, by David Bax

Allan Dwan’s Sands of Iwo Jima is an all-time classic. Its DNA, a blend of swashbuckling adventure, camaraderie, nobility and solemn fatalism not only informed later World War II projects like Saving Private Ryan (soldiers are killed almost immediately after...

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Monday Movie: The Graduate, by David Bax

Recently, I was washing my hands in a restaurant bathroom when “The Sound of Silence” by Simon & Garfunkel started playing over the sound system. The man at the next sink, with a quizzical look, asked me, “What is this...

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Monday Movie: Loulou, by David Bax

Almost 30 years after the release of Maurice Pialat’s sometimes hilarious, often uncomfortable Loulou, it would still be seen as a big deal for movie to star both Isabelle Huppert and Gerard Depardieu. Here, though, in the early stages of...

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Monday Movie: The Damned Don’t Cry, by David Bax

The Damned Don’t Cry is notable for more than just having one of the greatest titles in the history of movies but even if it weren’t, that would still be enough. Whatever those lurid words may suggest to you, what exists...

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Monday Movie: Nobody Lives Forever, by David Bax

Pretty much every movie thief or con man seems to have the same rule: “Never fall in love.” Maybe, though, they just haven’t seen Jean Negulesco’s 1946 Nobody Lives Forever. Sure, you might have to shoot some guys but, at...

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Monday Movie: All the King’s Men, by David Bax

Watch a decontextualized clip of Broderick Craword as Willie Stark from the early part of Robert Rossen’s All the President’s Men and you’ll see an incendiary depiction of anti-establishment, proletariat fervor. It’s inspiring. It’s galvanizing. Viewed from the perch of...

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Monday Movie: Mad Love, by David Bax

1935’s Mad Love has kind of a crazy plot but it has an even crazier pedigree. The final film directed by Karl Freund, the brilliant cinematographer of The Last Laugh and Metropolis fame, Mad Love is also the Hollywood debut...

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Monday Movie: The Gay Divorcee, by David Bax

As evidenced by the name change from the stage play’s The Gay Divorce to The Gay Divorcee–reportedly because it was too immoral to treat divorce itself as happy–Mark Sandrich’s 1934 musical comedy is clearly not a true pre-Code Hollywood offering....

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Monday Movie: Kes, by David Bax

Angry art wielded in service of a specific sociopolitical agenda is rarely subtle (even when it’s good; see Sorry to Bother You or listen to Billy Bragg for proof). The same generally goes for movies about child/animal attachments (those can...