Archive | Rep-port RSS feed for this section

The Chicago Rep-port: 4/7 to 4/13, by Aaron Pinkston

6 Apr

Repertoire screenings may not be as abundant in Chicago as they are in LA/NY, but when you look around, there are many theatergoing delights. The Chicago Rep-port is a weekly(ish) series highlighting the best and most compelling repertory screenings in the Second City.

Doc Films five film series all continue this week, including a Japanese cult classic and a down-and-dirty British crime flick. On Monday, April 10, “Heat and Sand: The Desert Film” goes with Woman in the Dunes (Hiroshi Teshigahara, 1964, 35mm). Tuesday, April 11, “Stories from the New Land: Chronicles of the Migrant Experience” has the David Bax-approved The New Land (Jan Troell, 1972, Blu-ray), starring Max von Sydow. The Wednesday Robert Bresson series moves to one of the auteur’s less seen films, Une femme douce (Robert Bresson, 1969, DCP).

(more…)

The Chicago Rep-port: 3/31 to 4/6, by Aaron Pinkston

30 Mar

Repertory screenings may not be as abundant in Chicago as they are in LA/NY but when you look around, there are many theatergoing delights. The Chicago Rep-port is a weekly(ish) series highlighting the best and most compelling repertory screenings in the Second City.

Now that the European Union Film Festival has wrapped, the Gene Siskel Film Center returns to its programming of limited engagements, special events, and rep screenings. One of my favorite things about the Siskel is its ongoing partnership with the School of the Art Institute to offer patrons to “audit” a class each semester—a film series screening plus a lecture from a local professor. Currently, the series is exploring the “New Sensory Cinema,” and on Tuesday, April 4, they will be screening one of the strangest films of the decade, The Forbidden Room (Guy Maddin, 2015, DCP). Check back to this space as we continue to highlight the series as it runs through May.

(more…)

The L.A. Rep-port: 3/24 to 3/30, by Scott Nye

24 Mar

The big happening this week is undoubtedly the annual Noir City series happening at the Egyptian over the next ten days, full of seedy crime films both rare and popular, some virtually unseen and not available on DVD and some standard-bearing classics. This year has an interesting twist – they’re pairing the films by year, showing an A-picture and a B-picture for each night, much as they would have been shown upon release, and proceeding chronologically. They won’t be hitting every year between 1942 and 1953, but they’re getting most of them.

You’re better off just going to the Cinematheque site and browsing the schedule yourself, but my experience with the series over the years has been that it’s hard to really go wrong on any given night. Eddie Muller and Alan Rode of the Film Noir Foundation assemble the program, and they know their stuff, which partially means knowing what plays to an audience. And baby, these films play. I can certainly vouch for This Gun for Hire (1942, 35mm), Where the Sidewalk Ends (1950, DCP), and The Big Heat (1953, DCP), but with titles like Quiet Please, Murder (1942, 35mm), Escape in the Fog (1945, 35mm), Behind Green Lights (1946, 35mm), and I Was a Shoplifter (1949, 35mm), I’m excited to see what’s in store for us.

(more…)

The Chicago Rep-port: 3/24 to 3/30, by Aaron Pinkston

23 Mar

Repertory screenings may not be as abundant in Chicago as they are in LA/NY, but when you look around, there are many theatergoing delights. The Chicago Rep-port is a weekly(ish) series highlighting the best and most compelling repertory screenings in the Second City.

For over a decade, the Movieside Film Festival has put on fantastic marathons with the Massacre and Sci-Fi Spectacular, and this weekend they’ll fully venture into the fantasy genre for the first time. The Fantastic Fantasy Film Festival takes place on Saturday, March 25 from noon to 11 pm at the Brew & View at The Vic. The lineup includes:

The Dark Crystal (Jim Henson & Frank Oz, 1982, format unknown)

Flash Gordon (Mike Hodges, 1980, format unknown)

Director’s cut of Legend (Ridley Scott, 1985, format unknown)

Masters of the Universe (Gary Goddard, 1987, format unknown)

Dune (David Lynch, 1984, format unknown)

(more…)

The Chicago Rep-port: 3/17 to 3/23, by Aaron Pinkston

16 Mar

Repertoire screenings may not be as abundant in Chicago as they are in LA/NY, but when you look around, there are many theatergoing delights. The Chicago Rep-port is a weekly(ish) series highlighting the best and most compelling repertory screenings in the Second City.

The Music Box Theatre is always a good bet for rep screenings but this is a particularly good week. Kicking off the weekend are a pair of popular midnight screenings, with full audience participation encouraged: The Room (Tommy Wiseau, 2003, 35mm) on Friday and The Rocky Horror Picture Show (Jim Sharman, 1975, 35mm) on Saturday. If you’ve never seen The Room or Rocky Horror at a sold-out screening at the Music Box, you haven’t seen ‘em.

(more…)

The L.A. Rep-port: 3/10 to 3/16, by Scott Nye

9 Mar

UCLA’s Festival of Preservation keeps plugging away, starting with He Walked by Night (1948, 35mm) and Open Secret (1948, 35mm) on Friday. He Walked by Night is one of the many luminous collaborations between director Anthony Mann and cinematographer John Alton, and stars the absolutely superb Richard Basehart, but I gotta say, aside from the beat-The-Third-Man-down-the-drain finale, I don’t think very highly of it. It sort of feeds this weird postwar appetite audiences must have had for laborious explorations of how cops go about catching a criminal. Might go over better if you’re really into procedurals. I will be arriving late to catch Open Secret, a long-forgotten film noir tackling anti-semitism and starring the no-slouch-himself John Ireland.

(more…)

The Chicago Rep-port: 3/10 to 3/16, by Aaron Pinkston

9 Mar

Repertoire screenings may not be as abundant in Chicago as they are in LA/NY, but when you look around, there are many theatergoing delights. The Chicago Rep-port is a weekly(ish) series highlighting the best and most compelling repertory screenings in the Second City.

Though it isn’t exactly in the rep screening bucket, the theatergoing highlight this week (and throughout the month of March) is the Gene Siskel Film Center’s European Union Film Festival, which I’ve covered on this site for many years. This week’s offerings include films from Finland, the Czech Republic, the Netherlands, Sweden, Malta, Slovakia, Italy, Greece, Luxembourg, Spain, France, Poland, Croatia, Germany, and Belgium—the best offerings are the Dardenne Brothers’ The Unknown Girl (March 12 and March 15) and Bruno Dumont’s Slack Bay (March 11 and March 16). You can find the full EUFF schedule here.

(more…)

The L.A. Rep-port: 3/3 to 3/9, by Scott Nye

2 Mar

The Rep-port is a weekly(ish) series highlighting the best and most compelling repertory screenings in the city.

Happy days are here again in the form of UCLA’s biennial Festival of Preservation, a chance for the UCLA Film & Television Archive to show off all the new restorations they’ve completed. As mentioned last week, the festival runs all month in Westwood, and a $50 pass gets you into every one of their programs (tickets run $9 apiece otherwise).

I value the festival more for the possibility of discovery than any confirmation of what I already know is great, but this year kicks off with an absolute masterpiece, Ernst Lubitsch’s Trouble in Paradise (1932, 35mm). Longtime listeners may recall this is one of my all-time favorites, and I cannot wait to revisit it for the umpteenth time in such fine form. There’s always something new lurking in it, it seems. I’ve preceded by a 1931 short that apparently nobody’s seen since that year, and followed by Marion Gering’s western(?) I Take This Woman (1931, 35mm), starring Gary Cooper and Carole Lombard. I follow its genre with a question mark because, although UCLA’s description suggests that’s what it is, it’d be just about the only such film I’ve heard of Paramount releasing in this era. It does sound like more of a ranch romance than a gunslinger tale, so we’re not totally afield, but this once-thought-lost film should make for an interesting discovery at any rate.

(more…)

The L.A. Rep-port: 2/24 to 3/2, by Scott Nye

23 Feb

It’s Oscar week in Hollywood, which shuts down a good deal of activity, but there are still some solid programs to catch if you’re in the market for them.

The New Beverly is offering an exceedingly-rare chance to see Marcel Carné’s Children of Paradise (1945, 35mm) on 35mm this Friday and Saturday. If you have the space in your schedule, it is absolutely essential viewing. Not just a landmark film, but a really moving, funny, beautiful and rich experience as well.

(more…)

The L.A. Rep-port: 2/17 to 2/23, by Scott Nye

16 Feb

If you’ve been following this column this month, you’ll have a pretty good idea of what to expect this week – female filmmakers at UCLA, David Lynch at the Egyptian, and B-westerns at the New Beverly. But certainly don’t start tuning out now, there’s too much good stuff to come.

I’ll start with a film that was one of my favorite discoveries last year when Cinefamily showed it as part of their own independents-of-the-’80s series – Susan Seidelman’s Smithereens (1982, 35mm). This is one gutsy, frank, audacious movie, featuring an unapologetically unlikable female protagonist who you wouldn’t dare to stop watching. She might just pick your pocket. They’re also showing a Jane Campion short before that, so that’s pretty cool.

(more…)