BP Movie Journal 2/4/16

5 Feb

the-final-girls

Tyler and David discuss the movies and TV shows they’ve been watching, including:

Movies
Oscar-nominated animated shorts
Oscar-nominated live action shorts
THEY MADE ME A FUGITIVE
TAXI
A WAR
CRYSTAL LAKE MEMORIES
THE NIGHTMARE
THE FINAL GIRLS
HAIL, CAESAR!
THE BRONZE

TV
CHILDRENS HOSPITAL
SURVIVOR (season 27)

Tyler’s Movie Collection: Best of Enemies

5 Feb

Pride and Prejudice and Zombies: Sleepwalking, by Rudie Obias

5 Feb

PPZ

There’s just something about mixing movie genres that can be really exciting. Movies like From Dusk Til Dawn and Never Let Me Go prove that striking a balance between two very different genres can bring out the best in both, revitalizing what we thought we had a handle on. Unfortunately, Pride and Prejudice and Zombies doesn’t fit as either a good Jane Austen adaptation or a zombie movie with tension and gore. However, it partially succeeds thanks in part to some of its charming cast.

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Rams: Don’t Get Left Behind, by David Bax

4 Feb

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Using a cold, hard, Icelandic winter in a community of sheepherders to tell the story of two bitterly estranged brothers, Grímur Hákonarson’s Rams employs big, powerful and effective metaphors to illustrate the psychic landscape of its lead and his intractable, hard-drinking brother. Wisely, Hákonarson complements his oppressive setting and doleful characters with a lacing of grim, dry humor.

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Tyler’s Movie Collection: Traffic

4 Feb

Southbound: Purgastories, by Ian Brill

3 Feb

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Horror anthology films have had a resurgence with VHS and The ABCs of Death. Southbound moves the resurgence forward by telling five short stories that coalesce, sharing the same desert locations and certain characters. The location is vital, for all stories take place on a stretch of desert highway that proves to be somewhere just beyond reality. The central characters live with some kind of guilt and sin, and this desert location may just be the world between the living and the dead.

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Home Video Hovel: The Guardian, by Alexander Miller

3 Feb

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I was hoping that The Guardian would turn out to be another wrongfully slandered William Friedkin film, that this title would be another entry in the subset of maligned movies from the director like Sorcerer and To Live and Die in L.A., both of which have recently enjoyed a renaissance after they came out on Blu-Ray. William Friedkin is obviously no slouch, and his scattershot career is something of a sub-genre unto itself of erratic brilliance. Hailed as the directors return to the horror genre The Guardian earned some passionate dismissal from critics and audiences alike upon its release but has since developed a cult following. If David Cronenberg is the leading name in developing the body horror genre then Friedkin was at the precipice to capitalize on the potential “Enviro Shocker” market. Honestly, though, The Guardian feels like cues were taken from Rosemary’s Baby, The Nanny and The Evil Dead. While it strives to attain the same accolades as these films the final product is a fragmented schizoid. At this point in time mainstream horror was edging away from slasher fare and more towards the informal “stranger danger” territory with features such as Pacific Heights, When a Stranger Calls, Fatal Attraction, and Dead Calm. This influence is employed with the supernatural as a Druidian sorceress played by Jenny Seagrove assumes the form of the perfect nanny who seduces an insipid young couple into taking care of their newborn. It just so happens that she has an air of mystery and a history of sacrificing babies to her titular tree god. This outlandish premise admittedly sounds dumb, but if you take the bait The Guardian is bizarre enough to enjoy as a b-movie oddity; despite being a big studio project. Despite the requisite level of earthy horror and gore, the main problem running through the heart of this movie is an identity crisis that severely sabotages any chance of this movie being more than jangled misfire.

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Home Video Hovel: Bolero / Ghosts Can’t Do It, by Mat Bradley-Tschirgi

3 Feb

bolero

Once upon a time, Bo Derek was a sex symbol. Several of her early films were directed by her husband John Derek; two of these, Bolero and Ghosts Can’t Do It, are featured in this new double feature Blu-ray release from Shout Factory. Both are odd romantic comedies with copious nudity and stilted acting. No special features are included except for a single trailer for each film.

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Tyler’s Movie Collection: Team America: World Police

3 Feb

I Do Movies Badly: Spike Lee

3 Feb

SpikeLee

Jim is joined by Rudie Obias to discuss director Spike Lee.