Movie Meltdown: King Arthur: The Legend of a Guy

21 May

This week, the Meltdown Gang dcides to go see Guy Ritchie’s new movie King Arthur: Legend of the Sword.

Ask BP (May 20, 2017)

21 May


Tyler and David discuss animation, accents, and throwing popcorn.

The Jogger (directed by Josh Long)

20 May

Double Feature: In a Valley of Violence/The Devil’s Backbone

20 May

In this episode, Eric and Michael discuss Ti West’s In a Valley of Violence and Guillermo Del Toro’s The Devil’s Backbone.

BP’s Top 100 Challenge #61: La Dolce Vita, by Sarah Brinks

19 May

I decided to undertake a movie challenge in 2017. This seemed like a good way to see some classic movies that I have unfortunately never seen. The Battleship Pretension Top 100 list has a good number of films I hadn’t seen before so it is a good source for my challenge.

The life styles of the rich and famous can seem exotic and glamour to the rest of us. La Dolce Vita certainly shows that side of life, but it also shows the darker, less appealing side. I found the lead character Marcello fascinating to watch as he balanced his job with his dream of becoming a real writer and his relationship with his hysterical fiancée and his many affairs.

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What the Hell Are You Watching: Whiplash

19 May

In this episode, Lincoln is joined by Brian Crawford Scott to discuss Damien Chazelle’s 2014 film Whiplash.

BP Movie Journal 5/18/17

18 May

Tyler and David discuss the movies and TV shows they’ve been watching, including:

Movies
ABACUS: SMALL ENOUGH TO JAIL
DREAMSCAPE
THE ISLAND OF DR. MOREAU
THE MAN WHO SKIED DOWN EVEREST
HAROLD AND LILLIAN: A HOLLYWOOD LOVE STORY

TV
AMERICAN EXPERIENCE: WAR OF THE WORLDS
SILICON VALLEY
THE LAST MAN ON EARTH
SURVIVOR
THE AMAZING RACE

Abacus: Small Enough to Jail: The Richest Man in Town, by David Bax

18 May

Two years ago, Adam McKay gave us The Big Short, a furious, funny account of the causes of 2008’s financial crisis. After that sprawling account of how massively things went wrong due to institutionalized shortcuts and routine lies, we now get Steve James’ measured and unassuming documentary Abacus: Small Enough to Jail, a look at the only bank to face criminal charges in the aftermath. While nowhere near the high water marks James set with films like Hoop Dreams, Stevie and The Interrupters, Abacus is still a modest success on the level of James’ Head Games, another issue-driven documentary that never lets you forget the individual people at the story’s core.

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Paint It Black: My War, by David Bax

18 May

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From nearly the beginning of Amber Tamblyn’s Paint It Black, I had my guard up. Shots of the Echo Park Blvd. street sign and the cult famous happy foot/sad foot spinning podiatrist sign made me worry that I was in for a try-hard catalog of cool kid L.A. signifiers. Things nearly came to a peak when the protagonist, Josie (Alia Shawkat) answered the phone in her apartment and it was a hot pink, decorated, chunky plastic artifact of a landline. Shortly after this, though, it occurred to me that I may have been too harsh. At the very least, the phone thing was forgiven as I gained the realization that this was a period piece (probably sometime in the 1980s). That doesn’t explain why characters are seen drinking cocktails out of mason jars at a hip bar but the subtlety of the era is commendable. Once I’d relaxed, I eventually found myself under the sway of this messy but unique movie.

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Alien: Covenant: Safe Spaces, by Scott Nye

18 May

Alien: Covenant was not screened for critics in 3D (though it will be released that way), and for that I am grateful. Whereas Prometheus – one of the great modern 3D films – patiently explored space and depth in carefully-controlled shots meant to let the viewer consider the divine, Covenant is a much more intimate affair. The mix of camerawork style and resolution shows Ridley Scott in more unusual digital territory, giving up tight control in favor of chaos. If only the film had been so bold. Its intimacy is limited to the body and what surrounds it. It nearly shuts out all the pretentious tussles with man’s search for purpose that so frustrated many in Prometheus. Those moviegoers will be delighted to hear that Covenant is more focused, more sensible, and contains a whole lot more action. However, I have rarely found “focused and sensible”, while admirable in a person, to be as compelling in art, least of all a horror movie.
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