The BPs Awards Show

18 Feb

Darrell Tuffs presents from an underground bunker in London.

Our tribute to the late Paul Goebel.

The BPs Ceremony 2017

18 Feb

BPs 2017 Red Carpet

18 Feb

Presenter Ryan O’Leary arrives with his date.

Fan favorite Ian Brill arrives to present at the show.

BP’s Top 100 Movie List Challenge #87: Some Like It Hot, by Sarah Brinks

18 Feb

I decided to undertake a movie challenge in 2017. This seemed like a good way to see some classic movies that I have unfortunately never seen – the Battleship Pretension Top 100 provided just that challenge.

My only experience with Some Like it Hot before this viewing was on an airplane about fifteen years ago on a high school trip to Hawaii. Needless to say a bunch of teenagers on a plane to a tropical paradise were less than engaged in a black and white film about cross-dressers. Now that I have finally seen it in earnest, I don’t blame teenage me for giving this a miss on the airplane, but I am glad I finally caught up with it.

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The BPs are almost here!

18 Feb

The Classic Horror Cast: Phantasm

17 Feb

In this episode, Erik, Sean, and Kyle discuss Don Coscarelli’s Phantasm.

CLICK HERE TO LISTEN

Double Feature: Inland Empire/My Son, My Son, What Have Ye Done

17 Feb

In this episode, Eric and Michael discuss Inland Empire and My Son, My Son, What Have Ye Done?

Craig’s Top Ten of 2016

17 Feb

2016 has been my favorite year in film since I began writing for Battleship Pretension a few years ago. It pains me that I can’t include more films on this list, so before I begin, I want to list all of the films that didn’t make my list but left a significant impression: Hunt for the Wilderpeople, Arrival, Green Room, 20th Century Women, Tony Robbins: I Am Not Your Guru, Hell or High Water, 13th, Swiss Army Man, Gleason, The Jungle Book, Hail, Caesar, Weiner-Dog, The Nice Guys, Keanu, Jim: The James Foley Story, and Kubo and the Two Strings.

There were a lot of great films this year. Here are my 10 favorite:

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The Great Wall: Clash of the Titans, by David Bax

16 Feb

Like its horde of monster villains that only awaken to attack China every 60 years, Zhang Yimou’s The Great Wall is slow to come to life. The opening scenes, in which a band of pan-European mercenaries led by Irishman William (Matt Damon) and Spaniard Tovar (Pedro Pascal) ride through the Northern Chinese countryside, evading capture and seeking to steal the secret of gunpowder in order to sell it back home, are plodding and hokey, with dialogue marked by exchanges that were clearly reverse engineered from the quips (“I’ve been left for dead twice. It was bad luck.” “For who?” “The people who left me.”) Once William and Tovar arrive at the Wall itself, though, some color and life begin to flow into the movie. This trend will continue; any scene that features no Chinese characters (Willem Dafoe also appears) is comparatively dull and drab. Perhap Zhang is tugging back at the problematic “white savior” conventions of the screenplay by reminding us that the only reason the Europeans (or the audience) are present is because of the Chinese setting and characters. Still, the first major battle sequence is the movie’s least thrilling, consisting largely of noisy effects shots alternating with shots of people reacting to them, like a chintzy episode of Charmed. But it’s in these same scenes that we are introduced to the “Nameless Order,” The Great Wall’s fictitious military legion tasked with repelling the army of beasts. The more time we get to spend with them, their innovative battle tactics and their byzantine hierarchy, the more the movie starts to have fun, kicking off a snowball effect in which each set-piece outdoes the last, building to an implausibly rollicking finale.

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The L.A. Rep-port: 2/17 to 2/23, by Scott Nye

16 Feb

If you’ve been following this column this month, you’ll have a pretty good idea of what to expect this week – female filmmakers at UCLA, David Lynch at the Egyptian, and B-westerns at the New Beverly. But certainly don’t start tuning out now, there’s too much good stuff to come.

I’ll start with a film that was one of my favorite discoveries last year when Cinefamily showed it as part of their own independents-of-the-’80s series – Susan Seidelman’s Smithereens (1982, 35mm). This is one gutsy, frank, audacious movie, featuring an unapologetically unlikable female protagonist who you wouldn’t dare to stop watching. She might just pick your pocket. They’re also showing a Jane Campion short before that, so that’s pretty cool.

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